What Is Wicca All About? Part I

The average person has only heard about Wicca in passing. Perhaps a cousin is a Wiccan or they heard about some controversy about Wicca in the news. Many are left with the impression they are some sort of “Satanic witches” or a strange and tiny cult. Both are quite contrary to the truth. Wicca is a faith rooted in Earth reverence and the practice of magical, spiritual rituals.

Wicca has holidays, rites, small traditions, and so forth like any other religion. It is an incredibly diverse faith with many branches and sets of beliefs. There is no established orthodoxy or ruling structure. Most Wiccans are “eclectic”, meaning that they draw information and mythology from several sources. That noted, there are some unifying features that define the faith.

Nearly all Wiccans revere the God and Goddess as harmonized, co-equal creators. The God is most commonly associated with the Sun and Sky. The Goddess is most commonly associated with the Moon and Earth. Due to a perception of patriarchal (male-centered) practices and studies in other faiths and academic religious studies, Wiccan materials typically spend more time exploring and explaining the Goddess. Some tiny extremist sects, such as Dianic Wiccans, revere the Goddess as exalted above the God or sometimes even to the exclusion of the God.

The Wiccan Rede, detailing the basic beliefs and ethics of Wicca, is a central tenet in the faith. The most popularly known portion is called the Rule of Three, which is a keystone article of faith for Wiccans. The Rule of Three states that whatever you do with magick will return to you threefold. A witch that uses hexes and curses regularly will find herself beset with misfortune. According to Wicca, the witch that casts Love Spells, performs healing rituals, and wishes well-being unto others will be rewarded under the Rule of Three.

A related portion of the Rede states that the core rule is “an it harm none, do what ye will”. Translated into common English, that simply means: “If you’re not hurting anyone, do whatever you’d like to do.” Respecting others, including their free will and well-being, is an essential tent of the Wiccan faith.

Wicca is a rich and ethical faith with colorful traditions and an engaging mythology. It is certainly not a religion for everyone, but it is fascinating to read about.

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2 Responses
  1. […] In Part I, I talk about the basics of the deities and ethics in Wicca. Rituals and mythology play a key role in the Wiccan faith and I will discuss them here. The practice of magick is a defining feature of Wicca, as is the complex and interesting theology of the God and Goddess. […]

  2. There exists no dogmatic moral or ethical code followed universally by Wiccans of all traditions, however a majority follow a code known as the Wiccan Rede, which states “an it harm none, do what ye will”. This is usually interpreted as a declaration of the freedom to act, along with the necessity of taking responsibility for what follows from one’s actions and minimising harm to oneself and others

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